Art references and Resources

verticalvest:

someone asked me if I could do a step-by-step on how I draw faces and make interesting expressions while still keeping the facial structure intact so I did… this.  there’s really no secret to it, it’s just utilizing knowledge of how stuff works in a really specific way!  I’m terrible at teaching, I’m sorry.

eyecaging:

These seem like great exercises. I don’t know who did two of these but the third image is Ron Lemens video is here. If someone reblogs with a source for the other two I’ll add them.

Thanks Sorry-So-Sorry!

First three here

h-a-r-p-o:

Dan Fessler’s HD Index Painting Technique let’s you paint pixel art in Photoshop in a non-destructive manner, and lets you use pretty much every tool in a perfectly pixel-gradient fashion!

The article gives you everything you need to try it out for yourself.It’s easy to set up and use, and the results are so fucking cool.

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - FeetI don’t often have to draw bare feet, unless I’m doing Life Drawing. When storyboarding, the focus is generally not on the feet. They also are usually covered (shoes, socks), or just not shown on screen that much. Nonetheless, it’s important to understand their functionality and general appeal. Keep details to a minimum, unless the character uses its bare feet to grasp things or do things with them most humans don’t. The best example of pushing feet to an extreme degree of functionality would be Disney’s Tarzan (one of my all time favorite). Other than that, don’t draw too much attention to them, but find appeal in its shapes.Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Feet

I don’t often have to draw bare feet, unless I’m doing Life Drawing. When storyboarding, the focus is generally not on the feet. They also are usually covered (shoes, socks), or just not shown on screen that much. Nonetheless, it’s important to understand their functionality and general appeal. Keep details to a minimum, unless the character uses its bare feet to grasp things or do things with them most humans don’t. The best example of pushing feet to an extreme degree of functionality would be Disney’s Tarzan (one of my all time favorite). Other than that, don’t draw too much attention to them, but find appeal in its shapes.

Norm

helpfulharrie:

egberts:

15 layers of art. none of them labeled. one line that isn’t supposed to be there. good luck.

the solution to that is really simple. If in SAI, press ctrl+shift and it’ll tell you what layer you’re hovering over

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And if in photoshop, go to the move toolimage

Make sure it is set to Layer, and either turn on Auto-Select or hold down ctrl, then click on the offending line.

giancarlovolpe:

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Push it!Clarity is probably the most important thing to think about at all time when boarding. Pushing your poses to an undeniable level of clarity will improve the clarity of the storytelling in general. Don’t leave space for uncertainty in posing out your characters. Your audience will be more engaged and entertained by the sequence.This is the last post for the Super Week. I hope you enjoyed it. Back on the regular schedule next week (Every Tuesday).Norm

What a great series.  Thanks for posting these!

giancarlovolpe:

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Push it!

Clarity is probably the most important thing to think about at all time when boarding. Pushing your poses to an undeniable level of clarity will improve the clarity of the storytelling in general. Don’t leave space for uncertainty in posing out your characters. Your audience will be more engaged and entertained by the sequence.

This is the last post for the Super Week. I hope you enjoyed it. Back on the regular schedule next week (Every Tuesday).

Norm

What a great series.  Thanks for posting these!

Professional Animation Software offer for Charity!

anatomicalart:

My animation teachers informed our class of this, and I thought it would be worth sharing.

macheist.com is offering an EXTREMELY good deal on  the following software!

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This You get all the above software (including the student version of the professional animation software ToonBoom, which is very similar to Flash.) for $19.99.
ToonBoom itself usually costs $249.
This software bundle would usually cost $1,786.
What’s the catch? Only that 10% of the money you spend will be given to a charity of your choice!

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Seriously guys! Look how much they’ve raised so far.

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Toonboom was used in the production of the following TV series, and even more animated feature films. (according to Wikipedia).
It is a professional standard software.
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I know a lot of our followers are animators, and even more are artists so this is worth your consideration.

[Follow this link to their website]
The deal will end in 15 hours time.

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This is not a stupid question at all! I’m glad you asked.

MacHeist gives you the promo code. You download the software from the software website itself. This means that if the software itself is compatible with Windows, you will be able to chose between a Mac OR Windows download.

I know for a fact that Toonboom (the animation software) Is compatible with both Mac and PC.

ToonBoom will work on Mac and/or Windows. 
You will have to check the individual websites of the other software for the specific compatibility information on them.

Instructions: (If you need help downloading)

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Art Reference

oxygentlemen:

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - HandsThis is the first post about hands. Other posts about hands in the future will cover “hands in relationship to the body”, “different characters, different hands”, “expressive hands” and “hands touching things”. If you have suggestions for Tuesday Tips, write me a personal message.Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Hands

This is the first post about hands. Other posts about hands in the future will cover “hands in relationship to the body”, “different characters, different hands”, “expressive hands” and “hands touching things”. If you have suggestions for Tuesday Tips, write me a personal message.

Norm

Hello! I read your FAQ and I hope that you havent answered this question before, if so Im sorry! Anywho I was wondering how do you shade / highlight your pictures. Ive been incredibly frustrated with my drawings lately to the point that I wont even finish a drawing. Im forcing myself too but Im still not satisfied. Thank you for all your help! <3

kinomatika:

Step by step, this is how I did it:

1. I had a sketch on a hot pink layer. I duplicated the sketch, turned the luminescence down, merged it all together. Slapped on a base skintone, merged that with the sketch.

2. I colorpicked a shading tone from the linework that ended up being like a vaguely purply-peach color. I made a little palette on the side for colors I’d be working with. Also, I’m painting all of this entirely on one layer so that’s something to keep in mind.

3. Grabbed some more colors for my shading palette from the linework + base color layer. Started playing with highlights as well.

4. Started blocking in where I wanted darker colors for the shading and kept on blending the highlights.

5. blend blend blend blend colourpick blend blend colourpick blend etc etc ad nauseum

6. thought the colours were looking a little washed out, so i duplicated the layer, set the duplicated layer to shade, turned it down to like 11% opacity, hue shifted it to be more peachy/pink.

7. decided it was TOO pink, hue shifted it to be more neutral/yellow.

8. shade shade shade blend blend colourpick define highlights define details define define define. Opacity of my brush was varying a LOT here, like fluctuating every 7-10 strokes. 

9. LE YEUX!

10. more defining. I narrowed the bridge of his nose a little and added more highlights.

11. LES YEUX! Deux yeux. Also more shading, hon hon hon.

12. Eyes are done. i think that’s the only thing thats changed here.

13. Alors, he is looking like he’s got some life in him now. This was a multiply layer, 100%, veeeery pale pink fluffed out with white.

14. And we’re done. This layer was a little bit of highlighting on the apples of his cheeks, around his eyes a bit more, I think I adjusted the weird neck-saddle shadow he’s got going on there, annnnd that’s about it!

Hope that helped! 

nayrosartrefs:

Some awesome leg tutorials done by n3m0s1s.

Claire’s fancy-pants HISTORICAL FASHION MASTER POST

shoomlah:

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So my historical costuming resources list from 2011 was less than a page long- I’m not saying that I’ve learned a lot in the past three years, but this list is now sitting pretty at a solid nine pages.  Whew.  And people wonder why I want to redo this damn series.

This list is by no means an exhaustive one- it’s a list of (primarily western) historical fashion resources, both online and offline, that is limited to what I know, own, or use!  It’s a work in progress, and I’m definitely hoping to expand on it as my knowledge base grows.  First things first, how about a little:

ADVICE FOR RESEARCHING HISTORICAL FASHION

  • Read, and read about more than just costuming.  Allowing yourself to understand the cultural and historical context surrounding the clothing of a particular region/period can be invaluable in sussing out good costume design.  Looking at pictures is all well and good, but reading about societal pressures, about construction techniques, daily routines, local symbolism, whatever else will really help you understand the rhyme and reason behind costuming from any given context.
  • Expand your costume vocabulary.  When you’re delving into a new topic, costuming or otherwise, picking up new terminology is essential to proper understanding and furthering your research.  Write down or take note of terms as you come across them- google them, look up synonyms, and use those words as a jumping off point for more research.  What’s a wire rebato?  How does it differ from a supportasse?  Inquiring minds want to know.
  • Double-check your sources.  Especially on the internet, and double especially on tumblr.  I love it, but it’s ground zero for rapidly spreading misinformation.  Books are usually your safest bet, but also take into account their date of publication, who’s writing them- an author’s biases can severely mangle their original source material.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask for help.  Do everything you can to find out information on your own, but feel free to reach out to people with more specialized areas of knowledge for help!  Be considerate about it- the people you’re asking are busy as well- but a specific line of questioning that proves you’re passionate and that you respect their subject matter expertise can work wonders.

Okay, onto the links!

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It’s impossible to overstate the importance of getting off the internet and looking into books!  God bless the internet, but books are (generally, this isn’t a rule) better-researched and better-sourced.  Bibliographies also mean each individual books can be a jumping off point for further research, which is always a fantastic thing.

Remember- owning books is awesome and you should absolutely assemble your own library of resources, but LIBRARIES.  Libraries.  You’ll be surprised to find what books are available to you at your local library.

GENERAL / SURVEYS

Patterns fo Fashion books
Detailed, hand-drawn diagrams of historical fashion, inside and out.  Pretty amazing stuff.

Fashion in Detail books
Not what you want if you’re looking for photos of entire costumes- note the “in detail” bit up there.  Just a beautiful series, and great reference for all the little things you might miss otherwise.  The V&A has an amazing fashion collection, and it’s great to see them share it with the world.

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dyemelikeasunset:

Also consider looking at this and this

Hi~ I was in the middle of browsing you helpfulthings stuffs and wondering if you have some tips about headphones and earphones^^ Thanks a bunch in advance if you are willing to do one ^^

kelpls:

not limited to the above examples and as always it’s best to google up some rl refs to get a hang of the general shape and how it fits on a head!